Copywriting, Website Optimization

One Easy Way to Boost Online Sales

Let’s say you manage an online storefront and you want to make more sales. You have decent traffic or you’re increasing your traffic with marketing campaigns, but you want your conversion rate to be higher on your product pages.

It’s long been established that trust is one of the biggest factors in sales. If potential customers have questions about your product or service that they can’t find answers to, they’re going to become skeptical of your business and look for a website that offers more information.

When a visitor is eyeballing your product page, you want them to feel like they have everything they need to make a confident and comfortable purchase.

You do this with product description.

A proper product description is going to do two things:

  • Inform
  • Entice

Your reader needs to know if the product is what he or she needs, so it’s crucial to provide enough information that he or she can say, “Yes, this is the one I want.”

Simultaneously, you want to paint a picture that allows the potential customers to envision themselves with the product, imagining how much better life will be once they have it.

They’ll look and feel amazing in those clothes. They’ll be safer and more fearless with this gear. Traveling will be more convenient with this bag. This lawn care service will make them the envy of the neighborhood. You get the idea.

Let’s say you’re selling a lady’s handcrafted ring. The customer needs to know the size, the color, the material, the weight, and any physical features, whether apparent in images and video or not (not all of your visitors can see your images and videos, but they can probably hear a screen reader).

Now your customer knows the ring won’t turn her finger green. It’s the right size, not too heavy and the filigree sounds charming. Your conversion rate is okay, but we want better than “okay,” don’t we?

So, you deliver those simple details in a skimmable blurb -written at an 8th-grade reading level- that leaves Ms. Buyer dreaming of the dinner party she will soon be attending, at which this stunning accessory will accentuate the blue of her eyes and sparkle softly in the intimate lighting.

Your reader is now picturing herself wearing the ring and instead of talking her into the purchase, it’s a matter of whether or not she will talk herself out of it. If the price is right, your chances are looking good.

Now you’ve made the sale, you’ve got a boost in SEO from your new original content, and your conversion rate is looking pretty damn good, which means your sales, revenue, and profits are up and Christmas is a little merrier this year.

With a little practice and study of consumer psychology, you can save yourself some pocket change and write your own product descriptions. But if you’re not a writer or you’re busy managing your business, a copywriter like me is always happy to oblige.

There are so many of us nowadays, rates are more affordable than ever, and you can generally be confident in the quality you’ll receive just by looking around the copywriter’s website and reading a bit of their writing, publications, and reviews.

 

Copywriting, Website Optimization

Writing for Yourself

I get a lot of clients who are writers, bloggers or other professionals with decent writing skills. They’re often embarrassed about coming to me for web content or other work, because they feel like they should be able to handle the job themselves.

Some of them simply don’t have the time. Creating a website and running a business is a consuming venture. Even when you dedicate your every waking moment to it, it’s still easy to fall behind. Getting the content writing or marketing copy out of the way can free you up to focus on the areas where you excel.

For others, however, the problem is just that they can’t seem to write for themselves. They can write all day long for their work or their clients or for fun, churning out creative, engaging material, but when it’s time to sit down and write their own About page, it all comes out wrong.

Let me reassure you, your skills are not the problem. For one reason or another, writing for your own business can be much more difficult than writing what you’re used to.

Writing for my own sites is one of the most drawn-out processes I go through as a professional. I have to refer to notes on things that I do every day, things that I have no trouble remembering when writing for clients. I find myself making common mistakes and forgetting to stick to the CTA of each page, so I have to revise again and again and I’m still not happy at the end.

Sales copy is easier for me personally to write for myself, maybe because it’s more personal, but I know there are many who have a hard time with both web content and sales copy.

The good news is that freelance copywriters like me can take over this part of the project, leaving you with more time and less stress. While I share your struggle in writing for myself, I thoroughly enjoy filling my days with writing for others and I have the skills to make your copy and content effective.

If you’re having trouble getting your words in order, contact me to find out how I can help. 

 

 

 

Copywriting

Commas

Some of you might have noticed that I am pretty stingy with my commas, to the point of omitting them when the rules of English says they should not be omitted.

I can hear some of you gasping already. “A professional writer deliberately omitting necessary punctuation??” Yes. Yes, that is what is happening. Breathe into a paper bag and allow me to explain.

It’s actually incredibly simple. Research has shown that readers are put off by too much punctuation, and sometimes the English language calls for too many commas. That’s it. Thanks for reading.

Cluttered text is as off-putting to a site user as a busy page layout. It’s crowded and ugly. It makes skimming more difficult. Cleaning it up and keeping punctuation down to two, maybe three max in one sentence opens up the page and makes it more visually appealing.

Now, you can’t just forget about them completely. Commas should not be skipped if skipping them changes the meaning of the sentence or if there would be a noticeable pause when speaking the text.

And before someone bites my head off, I know there are always exceptions. A professional website written in a formal tone should definitely not publish selective punctuation or sketchy grammar. Your audience will be more forgiving of the ugly commas, because they expect sharp precision.

As a writer who appreciates proper grammar, spelling and punctuation, I understand that this concept can be difficult to swallow. However, my job is to get conversions and the research does not lie. You lose this round, Punctuation Police.